We all use golf balls, but do you know what’s going on behind the scenes? Picking the right golf ball can make a big difference in your golf game. Check out this article we found on picking the right golf ball for you!

Seven Things You Need to Know About Golf Balls Before You Play

By James Roland

Source: GolfWeek

Internal differences make similar-looking golf balls perform in varying ways.

All golf balls look pretty much alike. But what’s inside the ball can affect the height and distance of shots and even how the ball will spin when it lands. So before you tee it up, find out more about the ball and how it can affect your game.

What will it cost

Golf balls vary greatly in quality and price, so before deciding on a particular make and model, know how much you can afford to spend and how quickly you go through a dozen golf balls. If you’re still learning or you lose a ball every couple of holes, you’ll want to stay away from the top-of-the-line balls, and, perhaps, consider used (or reclaimed) balls, which generally are cheaper than new balls.

Is it a distance ball?

A two-piece golf ball — a ball with a solid inner core and a hard cover — is designed to produce maximum distance. Typically, the hard cover is made of Surlyn. This type of ball is especially helpful for beginners or short hitters who need extra length on their shots. Because beginners tend to cut balls with poor shots or knock balls into trees and cart paths, the hard covers help those two-piece balls last longer.

Is it a performance ball

A high-performance ball is the most expensive ball on the market. It is made of multi-layer construction (three or four pieces) and uses a softer cover material, which allows for greater control, particularly around the green, and spin. Because of the softer cover materials, these types of balls are also the least durable. As a result, these balls are better fits for more experienced or expert players.

What’s the compression

Golf ball compression, which refers to the hardness and tightness of the core, is measured in numbers. The lowest compression commonly available is usually 80 (although lower compression balls are available). This compression level offers more distance but less control. A 100-compression (and higher) ball gives experienced golfers greater control. Inexperienced golfers and those who do not have a fast, solid swing, are unlikely to get any benefits from a higher compression ball. Most average golfers use a ball with a compression of 90.

What’s the spin

A softer cover, especially one made of balata or urethane, can give the ball extra spin, especially on shots for which you want a ball that will stop and back up on the green rather than roll forward off the green. Look for multi-layer construction with a softer cover if you’re looking for more spin on your shots.

What’s the ball’s condition

Before you tee up the first ball you find in your bag, take a moment to see if it has been scuffed or cut. The slightest deviation can adversely affect how the ball flies and how it lands. If it’s a casual round with a buddy and you don’t want to risk an expensive ball around a lake or stream, maybe the two of you can agree to try a sacrificial ball on those shots.

It’s worth experimenting

The more you play a particular type of ball, the better you’ll know whether it’s the right one for your game. If you try a different type every time out, you’ll never know what ball will help you reach your potential, so give each ball type at least a few rounds to see if you two are a good match.

Link to article: Click HERE

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The dreaded shanks- a golfer’s worst enemy & something we’ve all struggled with. Next time you hit a shank, think about these tips we found from Michael Breed to help you hit straight on target.

Shank solution: These two changes will save you

By Michael Breed

Source: GolfDigest

Hitting a shank is bad enough, but they tend to come in bunches. That can really mess with your mind—and your score. Anyone who tells you to forget you just rocketed one into the trees on the right has never lived with the shanks. Consider the cause. Typically, the clubface is wide open at impact, and the swing is out to in, with the clubhead coming from the far side of the strike line and cutting to the inside. Those two conditions expose the hosel, which hits the ball, shooting it right.

First, fix the face. Square the clubface, then place both your hands on the grip in what’s called a strong position—turned dramatically away from the target. Don’t just grip the club and turn your hands back; that only rotates the face open. The combination of a square face and strong grip is what helps you close the face through impact.

“Stay turned, and let the club drop to the inside.”

Next, fix the path. Swing back, making a full shoulder turn, and as you start down, keep your back to the target a beat longer. The club will drop to the inside of the target line. From there, you can swing out to the ball without worrying about the hosel being exposed from an out-to-in path.

These changes should do the trick, but if you need a maximum dose of shank-proofing, here’s one more: Try to hit the inside-back portion of the ball with the toe of the club. That will keep your path coming from the inside and prevent the hosel from moving closer to the ball. Shanks solved!

ADVANCED CONCEPT : MAKE THE SHAFT MISS THE BALL

THINK OF BASEBALL: You’re trying to swing the bat into the ball—simple. In golf, if you envision the shaft hitting the ball, you’ll probably make contact off the hosel because that’s the end of the shaft. Instead, you have to learn to miss the ball with the shaft. The clubhead extends out farther than the hosel so you want to swing the shaft to the inside of the ball. The image of the shaft missing to the inside will help you produce center-face contact. This mind-set might be just what you need to shake those shanks.

— with Peter Morrice

Link to article: Click here

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MEMBER-GUEST MONTH

THROUGH THE MONTH OF AUGUST!

Summer is in full swing & it’s the perfect time to get out & golf! We want to show everyone what makes Highland Green Golf Club so special- that’s why August is Member-Guest Month.

Any guest of a member receives a $25 green fee & 10% off food (day of play). ALL. OF. AUGUST.

Come see what all the hype is about!

BOOK A TEE TIME

SEE WHAT OUR MEMBERS GET!

Membership at Highland Green Golf Club has its perks. Our members get:

° Reciprocal rates at our sister clubs
° Guest-of-a-member rates
° 1 pass to each Resurrection golf property
° 14-day priority tee times
° Access to club & DUCK pub events
° 10% off pro shop purchases of $15 or more

…and MUCH MORE!

LEARN MORE

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Sometimes the best thing you can do for your golf game isn’t employing advanced techniques. To master the game, you’ve got to ace the basics first. Check out this article we found by Todd McGill teaches you how to golf like a pro by using basic techniques.

Learn to play like the pros by mastering course management basics

By Todd McGill 

Source: Golf WRX

The line that is drawn between amateurs and professionals certainly covers more than one aspect. However, there are some things that anyone can do in order play like the pros and shoot better scores. Knowing how to plot your way around the course from tee to green is something that not many amateurs take into consideration, though it is something that professionals do so well. Learning how to play to your strengths and learning to take what the course gives you will ultimately lower your scores, no matter what your handicap.

From the tee
-Use sound judgment when setting up on the tee box by knowing what your miss is and playing for it. For example, for those that fade that ball, teeing the ball on the right side of the box allows you to play for your shot shape with more room for the ball to work. This is also the case for playing away from trouble, in being that lining up on the side of trouble allows you to play away from it.

-In some cases on short holes, make a note to hit your tee ball to where you leave yourself with a comfortable yardage for your approach. You don’t gain anything from hitting a driver if it leaves you with a feel shot from 30 yards when you could hit a wood or hybrid and leave yourself with a full club in. (This is also the case when hitting your second shot on a par 5)

Hitting into the green
-Know which pins you should attack and which ones you shouldn’t. The biggest mistake that many amateurs make is trying to hit the ball at a tucked pin. Even the professionals choose which flags to go at and which holes to play safe, making sure they leave themselves a putt rather than short siding themselves.

Chipping/Putting
-The biggest thing that gets us in trouble around the greens or on them is trying to make the ball go in the hole. It’s easy to get greedy with your shot and create the mindset that you have to make it when, in reality, it’s much more feasible to play for a three-foot circle around the hole. Leaving you an easy tap in. There is nothing more infuriating than a 3-putt.

I hope these tips will benefit your golf game by allowing you to manage your way around the golf course. The pros use these same approaches when they step on each hole, and it is imperative that you do also. We all may not have the ability that professionals do, but we can certainly learn things from them that will lower our scores.

Link to article: http://bit.ly/2MWSYxO

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