If you play a lot of hilly courses, you’re already familiar with uneven lies, including those of the downhill variety. This tricky position—in which your leading foot is below your back foot at address—can be very challenging, especially from short fairway grass. To ensure solid contact and a pin-seeking approach shot from a downhill lie, you’ll need to make the following three basic setup changes.

SET SHOULDERS PARALLEL

Your normal iron setup won’t work for this lie—the clubhead will bottom out too soon and you’ll make contact with the ground behind the ball. Instead, hold your club across your shoulders and tilt your spine toward the target until the shaft matches the slope of the hill. Once your shoulders are parallel to the slope, move on to step 2.

MOVE YOUR WEIGHT TO YOUR DOWNHILL FOOT

It’s critical to make ball-first contact from this lie, so play the ball in the middle of your stance (or at least slightly farther back than normal) and shift about 75 percent of your weight to your front, or downhill, foot. This will encourage your body to move in the direction of the slope, rather than hang back.

TRACE THE SLOPE

Last, extend your arms through impact so that the clubhead travels as low to the slope as possible. By swinging on the same plane as the hill, you’ll ensure ball-first contact and a smooth, full finish— and maybe even a birdie opportunity.

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THE RESURRECTION PASS

3 rounds, 4 courses, & the best golf in Maine. Make 2019 your year for golf. Buy a Resurrection Pass!

Now, when you purchase a Resurrection Pass, you will receive a digital voucher within 48 hours. Print this out & present at check-in to redeem.

EACH PASS INCLUDES

  • 2 passes for 18 holes w/cart good at Old Marsh Country Club, Penobscot Valley Country Club, or the Bath Golf Club
  • 1 pass for 18 holes (green fees only) at Highland Green Golf Club

4 COURSES

The Resurrection Pass gives you the best of Maine golf with access to 4 different Resurrection Golf properties.

Enjoy access to Old Marsh Country Club, the Bath Golf Club , Penobscot Valley Country Club, & Highland Green Golf Club , home of the Duck- Pub, Market, & Restaurant!

PURCHASE YOURS TODAY!

We have multiple ways to purchase- call, order online, or fill out our mail-in order form!

Call the Resurrection Golf HOTLINE at (207) 405-2000 to order over the phone.

SKIP WORK. PLAY GOLF.

OPEN HOUSE

February 2nd

11 AM- 2 PM

Come to our Open House on February 2nd for small bites, socializing, & fun!

 

WINE TASTING

3 PM- 5 PM

Get 5 amazing wines & 5 amazing small courses for $45 per seat.

#EatLocal with our favorite wine, beer, & farm-fresh Maine ingredients.

Limited to 30 seats- RSVP today!

RSVP at (207) 406-2109 
or email us HERE !

THE DUCK – PUB | RESTAURANT | MARKET
114 VILLAGE DRIVE
TOPSHAM, ME, 04086

Three important physical attributes that lead to more power in the golf swing are strong gluteal muscles, core stability and ankle mobility. Strong glutes should be obvious. They are prime movers in the golf swing and control the action of the pelvis. You also need strong muscles around the mid-section of your body to stabilize it as you swing a club, especially at faster speeds. Without it, you wouldn’t be able to keep your balance and hitting the ball with the center of the clubface would be a real challenge. The third attribute might have surprised you, but it’s just as important. Ankle mobility matters particularly in transferring weight from your back foot near the top of the backswing into the front foot as you swing down. If you think of the footwork of players such as Tony Finau, Bubba Watson and Justin Thomas—very big hitters—you might have an easier time understanding why functional movement in the ankles is a crucial part of power generation. They have active feet and extremely mobile ankles. Most long-ball hitters leverage the ground to store up power and then spring upward through impact. A good example of this was Tiger Woods’ swing while working with Sean Foley.

So what exercise can you do in the gym to improve function in your power-generating muscles? Squats. But not just any squats. In fact, the majority of people should avoid doing most types of squats—especially traditional barbell squatting—as it is one of the easiest ways to injure your lower back. Instead, try goblet squats. This exercise is great because it’s amazingly self-regulating, both in terms of form and safety. If there are issues with core stability or ankle mobility, you’ll know it the minute you try a goblet squat. If your trunk lurches forward or you can’t drop your butt down until your elbows are about knee height—or lower—then you’ll know you need to spend some time on core stability exercises and ankle mobility exercises. Continuing to practice the goblet squat will help, but you need some extra work on the exercises provided in the links, too. As far as how much weight to use, I recommend starting with a lighter dumbbell or kettlebell and then progressing to heavier weight as your form and range of motion improve. If you can’t easily pick up the weight with one arm, start with something lighter.

To watch me demonstrate a goblet squat, click on the video below. Add these to your workout and you’ll be priming your body for better power generation when you play.

Click here to watch the video.

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